$2.1M in street repairs, new K-9 font underlines Cadillac’s 2022 capital improvement plan | News

CADILLAC — Just like any household with limited cash and a list of projects to complete, the city of Cadillac must carefully plan how and when it spends its money.

To facilitate this process, expenditures are budgeted in the city’s Capital Improvement Program, which is a planning tool that gives staff and council a roadmap of project goals over the next few years.

About $3.8 million in proposed capital improvement spending is budgeted for the city’s next fiscal year, with the majority — about $2.1 million — going to the costliest types of projects — building replacements. roads.

Due to their high cost, Cadillac Chief Financial Officer Owen Roberts recently identified road replacement projects as the biggest challenge facing the city in terms of budgeting for capital projects.

For example, the city last year replaced a one-mile section of Chestnut Street for about $1 million. When a mile costs $1 million, and with about 60 miles of total pavement in the city to maintain — much of which is already in dire need of repair or complete replacement — Roberts said the 1.5 million dollars a year they receive from the government to fund these projects don’t do much, especially because that money has to be distributed on city streets.

“It continues to get more and more difficult from a funding perspective,” Roberts said. “It’s the thing that draws the most attention to this document (the CIP).”

For fiscal year 2022-23, the city plans to replace sections of five streets – West Division from Linden to Colfax, Carmel from Cobb to Stimson, Lester from Hobart to Howard, Ayer from Wheeler to Plett and Simons from Pine to Bremer.

While road works will take up the largest portion of CIP’s budget, a number of other notable projects are also planned for this year. They include the expense of $15,000 to obtain and train a new Cadillac Police Department K-9 officer to replace their current K-9, Sage, who will soon be retiring.

The CIP also includes approximately $400,000 in sewage treatment plant facility improvements and $400,000 in improvements at the corner of Cass, Mitchell and Chapin streets in conjunction with Phase II of the Cadillac Lofts development.

West Division Street — $550,000

This project involves the removal and replacement of a section of West Division Street between Colfax and Linden streets, in addition to sanitary sewer upgrades. The existing street has a rating of two out of 10. This project will replace 1,944 feet of street. Funds to pay for this project will come from the state’s Motor Vehicle Highway Fund and a small urban grant from the Michigan Department of Transportation.

Carmel Street — $300,000

This project includes the removal and replacement of a section of Carmel Street from Cobb Streets to Stimson Streets, in addition to ADA sidewalk ramp improvements, curb and gutter improvements, and roadway improvements. water. The existing street has a rating of three out of 10. This project will replace 2,175 feet of street. Funds to fund this project will come from the state’s Motor Vehicle Highway Fund.

Lester Street — $675,000

This project includes the removal and replacement of a section of Lester Street from Cobb Streets to Howard Streets, in addition to upgrading ADA sidewalk ramps, upgrading curbs and gutters, and upgrading of storm sewers. The existing street has a rating of 2/3 out of 10. This project will replace 1,906 feet of street. Funds to fund this project will come from the state’s Motor Vehicle Highway Fund.

Ayer Street – $410,000

This project involves the removal and replacement of a section of Ayer Street from Wheeler Street to Plett Road, in addition to upgrading storm sewers and the water main. The existing street has a rating of two out of 10. This project will replace 1,405 feet of street. Funds to fund this project will come from the state’s Motor Vehicle Highway Fund.

Simons Street — $250,000

This project includes the removal and replacement of a section of Simons Street from East Pine Streets to Bremer Streets, in addition to upgrading ADA sidewalk ramps. The existing street has a rating of two out of 10. This project will replace 766 feet of street. Funds to fund this project will come from the state’s Motor Vehicle Highway Fund.

K-9 Officer

The city’s current K-9 officer, Sage, has been with the Cadillac Police Department since 2013. Cadillac Director of Public Safety Adam Ottjepka said the careers of most K-9 officers is about 10 years old and Sage is approaching that time.

Training a replacement for Sage will be important, Ottjepka said, because the dogs are invaluable for a number of functions, including tracking suspects and searching buildings. Ottjepka said K-9 officers are also excellent for public relations at local schools.

It is estimated that the cost of training and onboarding the new K-9 will be approximately $15,000, with funds coming from general government revenues.

Wastewater treatment plant

Planned upgrades to the sewage treatment plant including purchase of an influent screw pump for $140,000, replacement of exterior doors and windows for $115,000, purchase of new software for $90,000 and the purchase of a new control panel for $100,000.

• According to the CIP, the old influent screw pump will no longer follow the influent flow. Purchasing a new unit is necessary to ensure the durability and reliability of the system that pumps wastewater through the facility and reduce the risk of backflow.

• Purchase of laboratory information management system and/or water information management system software is required to capture, manage and report data. The new software will significantly reduce manual entry of collected data and eliminate error-prone duplication efforts, according to CIP. It will also increase traceability and consolidate information into one integrated system.

• The existing doors and windows of the treatment plant leak excessively and do not function properly. Replacing them would save energy and improve the appearance of the installation.

• The existing plant control panel is obsolete and a new panel will provide more efficient control of plant processes.

Cass, Mitchell and Chapin upgrades – $400,000

Along with Phase II of the Cadillac Lofts project, the city plans to improve the area surrounding the development by improving streets, parking lots and sidewalks. It is expected that “local funds” will be used for this project, although the CIP does not indicate specifically where these funds will come from.

A public hearing for the proposed CIP will take place in April. In addition, a virtual copy of the document will be available on the City’s website shortly.

About Dwight E. McCray

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